The Long Wait, or, Other People’s Babies

During my midwifery training I worked 24 hour shifts on the Labor & Delivery unit of a community hospital. Several independent practices run by midwives or obstetricians admitted women to the unit; the practice with which I worked almost exclusively saw women who were recent immigrants to the United States, and who were insured by Medicaid (public insurance) due to their low household incomes. Women from the other practices tended to be higher-income and covered by private insurance. As a general rule, I was not allowed to assist with births unless they were for women whom we had cared for at our prenatal clinic, which is as it should be.

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A woman has been hastily escorted onto Labor & Delivery; the familiar hissing noise of the unit’s automatic double doors opening brings me scurrying hopefully into the hallway. The curse of the student is the desire always to be considered worthy of assistance (pick me, pick me!), the anxiety ever present that you will miss out on that critical experience that will make you feel, finally, competent.

But I am shooed away from the room. The woman is “not mine,” I’m told: “one of the Privates.” I stuff my hands into my lab coat pockets and skulk back to the midwives’ office, where I sit flipping through stiffened back issues of medical journals.

The days without births are the longest days. It’s the nature of the time — not electrified with the rush of an impending new being, not suffused with the peace that finally comes when everything has gone well: a contented baby clasped against the chest of a beaming new mother; a feeling like that one, perfect note for which Miles Davis claimed always to be searching. No, the days without births are staccato; my mind only half-able to engage, always in a state of tension like a muscle ready to spring into extension. Without a release of that energy my mood turns sour by nightfall.

The hours wear on with all but one room standing empty and pristine; fresh bed linens and sealed, sterilized instruments await the flurry of activity associated with a new arrival. For now, this one woman has the L&D floor to herself.

To stave off restlessness I sit outside her room and listen to the noises of her labor through the drawn curtain: the rise and fall of her moans, her labor as a stringed instrument. The low tones of her doula, the uncomfortable interjections of her husband. I watch the patterns created by the dual monitoring of her contractions and the baby’s heart on a screen at the nurses’ station, trying to find a correlation with the human sounds emanating from below the curtain; I cannot.

My calves go numb from squatting against the wall and I rise to move the minutes along. I complete my rounds on the postpartum unit early, listlessly. The women with their new babies seem uninterested in another face, another interruption, further instruction.

Returning to the labor floor, I pass the visitor’s lounge; the three silent, grey-haired occupants can only be expectant grandparents. I make the mistake of lingering too long outside the door. My white lab coat has caught their attention and they turn with a start, in unison, to hear the good news of a new baby’s arrival. No news! I say, unsatisfactorily. No news is still news, says the grandpa. We’ll just wait here, the two grandmas say. We don’t want to be a disturbance.

The light through the windows changes from yellow to grey and I watch clouds creep over the broad sky above the Hudson River. I hear sudden shrieking coming from the hallway and rush out, anticipating an imminent birth; instead I find the nurses huddled around a screen in the empty triage room cheering for Spain versus the Netherlands. The birthing woman herself remains hushed, and I wander up and down the hallway silently reciting clinical algorithms to occupy my mind: Repeat pap smear in 12 months…Colposcopy if HPV 16/18 positive…10-day progesterone challenge followed by a withdrawal bleed…TSH will be high and free T4 will be low…

Finally, the corridor is filled with the sudden vocal peaks and exhortations to blow, to pant, that mean that a labor is ending, that a baby’s head will soon be born. I tiptoe to the curtained doorway of the woman’s room — That’s it! I hear, The head is born! Now just rest before the last push. I know that I have less than a minute. I quickly slap the oversized metal button that opens the L&D doors, and see the three grandparents-to-be poised in the hallway. I gesture sharply to them to hurry, mouthing silently, Come right now! They skitter through the doors onto the labor floor, and we form a semi-circle outside the woman’s room. One more push, we hear, and then the wave of joyous cries of the woman, her husband, the nurses, the midwife.

The grandparents look to each other — has it happened?

The husband’s relieved voice reaches us from under the curtain: It’s a girl. The grandmas weep, the grandpa cups his face in his hands, and then: the short, sharp cry of their first grandchild. One of the grandmas jumps up with delight, and tears line the cheeks of all three.

I retrieve tissues from the nurses’ station, pass them around and then simply hand over the box. It will be a while now, I whisper. They nod vigorously and silently and, clutching each other, return to the worn black couches of the visitors’ lounge.

2 thoughts on “The Long Wait, or, Other People’s Babies

  1. I wonder if you’re aware of this award. Something to think about…?

    Literary Award: The Selzer Prize for Writing[edit]
    In 2010, The Abaton, a medical humanities literary and arts journal produced by Des Moines University, awarded the inaugural Selzer Prize for Writing. The award was created to honor Dr. Selzer for his contribution to the medical humanities and medical profession as a whole. The award will be given annually to a medical student whose essay or story stands out for its quality and humanistic focus. The award winner by year:

    2010 – Impostor or Not by Rachel Hammer, MS-II, Mayo College of Medicine
    2011 – Compliance by Nitin Ahuja, M.D., University of Michigan (Currently PGY3 at the University of Virginia)
    2013 – When I Came In by Trilochan Hiremath, MS-IV, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences
    2014 – Where Will You Find Happiness Now? by Christy Duan, MS-III, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

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