Telling Hard Birth Stories

Today is a quiet one on my narrow New York City street; the still, cold air, thick with snow, seems to be keeping everyone indoors. From my window I can see a lone soul scratching at the sidewalk outside his doorway with a shovel; the dull sound of ice giving way from the concrete echos distantly. Such days put me in mind of birth, of the calm needed to allow a woman to proceed unmolested, of the womb-like protection that should surround the mother. A day like today, on which I feel so grateful to be sheltered by four walls and roof, makes me want to shelter others, to bring everyone in from the storm.

For the past few months I have been wanting to use this space to tell stories from the end of my training as a midwife, but I’ve hesitated because they are often difficult stories. They are not the joyful, life-affirming tales of an eager, almost-midwife. Instead they reflect my state of mind at that time: sleep-deprived; constantly worried that I wasn’t skilled enough; convinced that I going to harm a woman or her baby.

As I was finishing my training, I was preoccupied with the transition to the very serious role of becoming a clinical decision-maker, and my concern over what would happen to the women and families that I cared for became all-consuming. All of which is, of course, a recipe for the burnout I then experienced and from which it took several months post-graduation to recover.

I’ve been wanting to tell the story of the last birth I attended as a student, mostly because it was so glorious, such a ringing high note on which to end my training. Instead of the sudden complications and near-disasters I had been witnessing, that last birth went so beautifully that there was almost nothing for me to do but admire the woman in her elemental elegance. No one laid an unnecessary hand on her, and she gave birth to her baby “in the caul” — that is, still encased in the bag of waters — like a goddess giving birth to the moon. For those of you who aren’t squeamish about human birth, here is a video of what that can look like:

 

Not long ago I realized that I had also been wanting to tell that happy story first in order to cushion the blow of all of the hard stories to come. I hadn’t wanted to scare off the students or aspiring midwives that read this blog, to have them think that this tremendous work is all anxiety and sleeplessness and heartache. But I do want to record how I actually experienced that time of transition, so I will begin with a snapshot of what happened to me at the end of last summer, when I slept very little, and with a promise that these stories won’t last forever.

*****

I am starting to forget things.

I always remember to check total weight gain, blood pressures, immunization status, but it’s all the other things — my parents’ anniversary, what time I’m supposed to be at the dentist’s office, which day last week I met with a friend…I’ve lost my makeup case three times this week. I definitely remember going out for dinner last night, and I definitely remember coming home and eating blackberries on the couch — and then I woke up in a haze at 8am. I have a vague recollection of announcing, at 11pm, that I was “just going to take a little nap.”

I read through a woman’s prenatal chart and see my name at the end of two of her notes; there is proof that I’ve seen her before, though I have no memory of it. I see a woman in the clinic elevator and put on the cocktail party face meant to meant to communicate all things to all people: that I’m a friendly stranger, that I’m happy to meet you, or that I’m so pleased to be seeing you again. I wait for her reaction to tell me which one is the case.

Five hours is starting to sound like plenty of sleep to me, and I’m beginning to wonder if I’m the only one unable to function after a few days of so little rest. On days off when I can sleep for eight or nine hours I wake up feeling like all is well with the world, and then wonder what on earth I would do if I had small children and couldn’t sleep for eight or nine hours on these days off. The next night I get five and half hours again and feel as if I haven’t slept in a year.

Normal people, the non-future-midwives, can’t understand why I start getting nervous and looking at my watch at 9:00pm the night before a shift. And I can’t understand how the seasoned midwife who has been on for the past 24 hours greets me looking so fresh, makeup recently reapplied and hair repositioned just so.

On the nights when I lie awake for a few minutes before sleep, after reciting the Shema, I think of Keats: “Save me from curious Conscience, that still lords/ Its strength for darkness, burrowing like a mole;/ Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards,/ And seal the hushed Casket of my Soul.”

 

 

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