Forged

When I was considering applying to nurse-midwifery school, I read a lot of nursing students’ blogs. Invariably, these students reached a certain point at which they caved; they had previously had lots of nice ideas about how they were going to lead balanced lives, in which school was simply one of their pursuits, but eventually they gave up that pretense. FINE, they would say, addressing nursing school as an evil taskmaster. You win! Here is every ounce of my energy and every hour of my time! Let me know when you’d like a pound of my flesh!

Since I’m an arrogant jerk, I thought that they were kidding. Or that they didn’t know how to manage their time well. Or maybe that they were just sort of slow. You will notice, however, that I stopped blogging after week 3 of the summer term – that’s about when I too gave in and acknowledged that basically all I was going to to do this summer was commute, sit in class, go to the hospital, and study – every day, approximately 16 hours a day.

I’m now on vacation, which means that I made it through the first term and am gearing up to begin the second in less than two weeks. Before it all gets going again, I want to try to write something here that might be helpful for anyone else considering this education.

The kind of accelerated BSN/MSN program that I’m in involves a totally unreasonable, uncivilized amount of work: all-day lectures, constant examinations, basic care of real patients beginning in week 2. It’s also a kind of academic work that, for someone with a liberal arts undergraduate degree, resembles nothing so much as weight training. Whereas most of my previous education involved polishing my skills of writing, critical analysis, and argumentation, 80% of my work this summer has been the straight memorization and application of large quantities of information: I spend my weekends bench-pressing pharmacology. It has been a muscular, at times numbing, process.

The rapidity with which this process not only educates you but prepares you to take on a new identity as a clinician is breathtaking, and quietly thrilling. They call this first summer Boot Camp because it is the academic and clinical equivalent of shaving your head, waking you up at 5am with reveille, and running you through combat drills until you’re not totally positive that you remember your full name.

Your vocabulary is remade, and you annoyingly delight in telling friends and family members the medical terms for common conditions and physiological processes. (“Did you know that your stomach growls are called borborygmi?” “I see that your baby has a club foot – did you know the name for that is actually congenital talipes equinovarus?!!”) You can see how completely insufferable you are becoming but you can’t do anything about it because you’re so stuffed with new information that you JUST HAVE TO TELL SOMEONE.

You come to find it normal to get up at dawn, spend a full day at the hospital, come home and study for six or seven hours. You ask unsuspecting friends to remove their shirts so that you can listen to their lungs. You conduct full physical assessments of your parents, figuring that if they’ve agreed to support you through grad school they might as well see that you’re learning something. You practice identifying physical anomalies by scrutinizing fellow passengers on the subway. (Nail clubbing! Bouchard’s nodes! Acanthosis nigricans!)

When your lab instructor sets out a table of needles, bottles of saline, and sterile swabs and offers you the chance to inject your classmates, you feel not horror but elation and recognize this as the highlight of your week.

After a couple months in the hospital you realize that you can no longer smell the eerie, sterile, chemical aroma of the unit that you initially found so disturbing. You find that you are increasingly comfortable touching the bodies of sickly strangers. You are humbled, but no longer surprised, when patients stand in front of you naked as the day they were born, asking for your help to clean themselves.

This is how these programs begin to turn a bunch of East Asian Studies majors, financial analysts, and Peace Corps volunteers into advanced practice nurses and midwives: they kick your ass until you’re pretty sure this is what your life has always been like.

I know I’m going to regret saying this, but I can’t wait to start again in September (when I am considering blogging about something other than the sheer volume of work that I have). Having finished the first term of this education, and with the perspective that comes from being on vacation, I feel completely remade – and exhilarated.

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